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Leopoldo Trieste received a BA in Economics Statistics and Social Science from Bocconi University, Milan, Italy, in 2004; a MSc in innovation management and a Ph.D. in Management from Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (SSSA), Pisa, Italy, in 2005 and 2010, respectively. Since 2010, he has been a Research Fellow at SSSA. He has authored or co-authored international papers on drug markets, the economic burden of specific diseases, the impact of diagnostic technology on clinical decision making, the analyisis of diffusion barriers for health and robotic technology. His current research interests include health economics, statistical methods and models in cost-effectiveness analysis, health technology assessment, diffusion of innovation in healthcare, decision theory and agent based models. 

Contributo su Rivista

Leopoldo Trieste received a BA in Economics Statistics and Social Science from Bocconi University, Milan, Italy, in 2004; a MSc in innovation management and a Ph.D. in Management from Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (SSSA), Pisa, Italy, in 2005 and 2010, respectively. Since 2010, he has been a Research Fellow at SSSA. He has authored or co-authored international papers on drug markets, the economic burden of specific diseases, the impact of diagnostic technology on clinical decision making, the analyisis of diffusion barriers for health and robotic technology. His current research interests include health economics, statistical methods and models in cost-effectiveness analysis, health technology assessment, diffusion of innovation in healthcare, decision theory and agent based models. 

 

Innovation AA. 2019-2020 Syllabus and information

What

Field: Economics and management of product innovation.

It is articulated into 3 main chapters:

a) introduction to the nature of technology, the economics of technical changes; the neoclassical and heterodox approaches to innovation and innovation diffusion (analysis of barriers to innovation diffusion and adoption);

b) business model for bringing innovation to the market

c) models, tools, and practices in innovation evaluation (ex ante and during R&D process, interim and ex- post evaluation of innovation) with a focus on the healthcare sector (HTA, economic evaluation of new technology and new healthcare program).

When 

The course covers 30 hours. It will take place every Tuesday 2:30 – 4:30 p.m.

1st lesson: October 2nd, 2018. Room: ADII2, Building A.

How

Students are expected to:

a) attend all the lessons;

b) actively participate to the discussion;

c) individually and/or involved in group, submit:

1) a paper on the first part of the course, with a focus on their research project (see Appenedix A);

2) a business model and or/a business plan based on the product/technology developed in  their course (see Appenedix A).

Final grades

Final grades are obtained assigning the following weights: class participation 0.1; 1st paper and presentation 0.4; business model and presentaiton 0.5. 

Syllabus and references

Part I Introduction (8 hs)

Technology: nature and perspective of analysis (2hs)

Differences between the supply and the demand side

  • Market and production, equilibrium and disequilibrium, equilibrium with shocks, non equilibrium and dissipative structures (irreversibility, self-organization and the role of institutions)

References

  • *Arrow K. 1962. Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention
  • Pasinetti LL. 1981. Structural Change and Economic Growth: A Theoretical Essay on the Dynamics of the Wealth of Nations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (1 Introduction)
  • *Dosi G, and Grazzi M. 2010. On the nature of technologies: knowledge, procedures, artifacts and production inputs. Cambridge Journal of Economics 34 (1):173-184.
  • *Dosi G, Orsenigo L. 1988. Coordination and Transformation: An Overview of Structures, Behaviours and Change in Evolutionary Environments. In Dosi G, et al. (eds.) Technical Change and Economic Theory.  London: Pinter Publisher. 
  • * Arthur BW.  2011 The Nature of Technology: What it is and How it Evolves. New York: Free Press.
  • Nicolis G, Prigogine I. 1971. Self-Organization in Non equilibrium Systems: From Dissipative Structures to Order Through fluctuation. New York: Wiley.

Innovation: a background (4hs)

References

  • Paoli M. 1992. Progresso Tecnico e Processi innovativi. Torino: Giapichelli.
  • *Fagerberg J., Mowery DC, Nelson RR. (Eds.) 2006. The Oxford Handbook of Innovation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • *Dosi G.  1988. Sources, Procedures, And Microeconomic Effects Of Innovation. Journal of Economic Literature 26, 3. 
  • *Dosi G. 1982. Technological Paradigms and Technological Trajectories. A Suggested Interpretation of the Determinants and Directions of Technical Change. Research Policy, 11:3; 147:162.
  • *Nelson RR, Winter SG. 1982. An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change. Cambridge: The Belknap of Harvard University Press.

Diffusion and adoption of innovation (2hs)

References

  • *Rogers EM. 2003. Diffusion of Innovations (5th ed.). New York: Free Press. 
  • Turchetti G., Vitiello N., Trieste L., Romiti S., Geisler E, Micera S. 2014. Why effectiveness of robot-mediated neuro-rehabilitation does not necessarily influence its adoption? IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, 7: 143-153.
  • Arthur BW. 1994. Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in the Economy. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • Dosi G., Ermoliev Y., Kaniovski Y. 1994. Generalized Urn Schemes and Technological Dynamics. Journal of Mathematical Economics 23, 1: 1–19.
  • Tornatzky L.G., Klein K.J. 1982. Innovation Characteristics and Innovation Adoption-Implementation: A Meta-Analysis of Findings. IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management 29(1): 28-45.

Part II Innovation management: paradigms and perspectives (6 hs)

Perspectives

References

  • Dogson M, Gann DM, Phillips N. 2014. Perspectives on innovation management. In Dogson M, Gann DM, Phillips N. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dynamic capabilities

References

  • Teece DJ. 2007. Explicating dynamic capabilities: the nature and microfoundations of (sustainable) enterprise performance. Strategic Management Journal 28(13): 1319-1350.
  • Teece DJ, Pisano G, Shuen A. 1997. Dynamic capabilities and strategic management. Strategic Management Journal 18(7): 509-533.
  • Teece DJ. 2009. Dynamic Capabilities and Strategic Management: Organizing for Innovation Growth. New York: Oxford University Press.

Absorptive capacity

References

  • Cohen W, Levinthal D. 1990. Absorptive capacity: a new perspective on learning and innovation.  Administrative Science Quarterly 3(6): 639–656.

Complementary assets 

References

  • Teece DJ. 1986. Profiting from Technological Innovation: Implications for Integration, Collaboration, Licensing and Public-Policy.  Research Policy 15: 285–305.

Part III Business models for innovation (12 hs)

What is a business model? (4 hs)

 References

  • *Parolini C. 2011. Business Planning. Milano: Pearson.
  • Abell Derek F. 1980. Defining the Business: the Starting Point of Strategic Planning. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.
  • *Chesbrough H., Rosenbloom RS. 2002. The role of the business model in capturing value from innovation: evidence from Xerox Corporation's technology spin‐off companies. Industrial and Corporate Change, 11, 3: 529-555.

Source of innovation

References

- Von Hippel. 1988. The source of Innovation. New York: Oxford University Press. Available at: : http://web.mit.edu/evhippel/www/sources.htm

- Shilling A. 2013. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation (4th ed). McGraw-Hill. 

  • Cohen W, Levinthal D. 1990. Absorptive capacity: a new perspective on learning and innovation. Administrative Science Quarterly 3(6): 639–656.

Whether and when? Entry strategies

References

  • Shilling A. 2013. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation (4th ed). McGraw-Hill. 
  • Mitchell W. 1989. Whether and When? Probability and Timing of Incumbent’s Entry into Emerging Industrial Subfields. Administrative Science Quarterly 34: 208-230.

Whether and when to invest in innovation 

References

  • Hu Y., Oksendal B. 1998. Optimal time to invest when price processes are geometric Brownian motions. Finance and Stochastic 2: 295-310.
  • McDonald R., Siegel D. 1986. The value of waiting to invest. Quart. J. Econ., 101: 707-727.  

Business models for innovation (2 hs)

References

  • *Tidd J., Bessant J., Pavitt K. 1997. Managing Innovation. Integrating Technological, Market and Organizational Change.  West Sussex: John Wiley& Sons. (It. Trans. 1999. Management of Innovation. Milano: Guerini e Associati.) 
  • Chesbrough H. 2006. Open Business Models: How to Thrive in the New Innovation. Cambridge(MA): Harvard Business Press.  (It. Trans. 2008. Open. Modelli di Business per l’innovazione. Milano: EGEA.)

Business models based on disruptive innovation (2 hs) 

References

  • *Christensen CM. The Innovator’s Dilemma (3rd ed.) 2003.  Cambridge(MA): Harvard Business School.
  • Christensen CM., Raynor ME. 2003. The Innovator’s Solution. Cambridge(MA): Harvard Business School.
  • Corsi S, Di Minin A. 2014. Disruptive Innovation… in Reverse: Adding a Geographical Dimension to Disruptive Innovation Theory. Creativity and Innovation Management, 23, 1: 76-90.
  • Corsi S, Di Minin A, Piccaluga A. 2014. Reverse Innovation at Speres. Research-Technology Management, July-August: 28-34.

Business models based on the strategic use of Intellectual properties (IPs) (4 hs)

IPRs –property rights and patents: introduction and overview

References

  • Ma MY. 2009. Fundamentals of Patenting and Licensing for Scientists and Engineers. London: World Scientific.
  • WIPO 2007. Patent Drafting Manual. Text available at:
  • http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/patents/867/wipo_pub_867.pdf
  • Cornish W, Llewelyn D, Aplin T. 2013 (8th edition). Intellectual Property: Patents, Copyrights, Trademarks & Allied Rights. London: Sweet & Maxwell.
  • Wallerstein MB, Mogee ME, Schoen RA. (eds.) 1993. Global Dimensions of Intellectual Property Rights in Science and Technology. Washington D.C.: National Academy Press. (part IV ch. 10; part V)

Market for technology and intermediaries of innovation 

References

  • Teece D. 200. Managing Intellectual Capital. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Gans J., Hsu D, Stern S. 2002. When does Start-Up Innovation Spur the Gale of Creative Destruction? RAND Journal of Economics 33, 6: 571: 586.
  • *Chesbrough H. 2006. Open Business Models: How to Thrive in the New Innovation. Cambridge(MA): Harvard Business Press.  (It. Trans. 2008. Open. Modelli di Business per l’innovazione. Milano: EGEA.

Strategic use of IPs 

References

  • *Chesbrough H. 2006. Open Business Models: How to Thrive in the New Innovation. Cambridge(MA): Harvard Business Press.  (It. Trans. 2008. Open. Modelli di Business per l’innovazione. Milano: EGEA
  • Copy left and new makers – Introduction

References

  • Anderson C. 2014. Makers: The New Industrial Revolution.  New York: Crown Business.
  • Lessig L. 2002. The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in a Connected World.  London: Vintage.
  • Lessig L. 2017. Free Culture. Independently published.

Economic evaluation of innovation

Evaluation of innovation 

References

  • Shilling A. 2013. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation (4th ed). McGraw-Hill. 
  • Robert S. Pindyck 2008. Lectures on real options. I-III. Available at the web address: http://web.mit.edu/rpindyck/www/Courses/RO_P1_Handout%20Slides.pdf
  • Tsujimura M. 2010. Assessing Alternative R&D Investment Projects under Uncertainty Processes. Annual International Conference “Real Options. Theory meets practice”.
  • Di Masi JA. 2001. Risk in new development: Approval success rate for investigational drugs. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 69: 297-307.

HTA and methods of economic evaluation of innovation in healthcare (4 hs)

References

  • *Drummond MF. et al. 2005. Methods for the Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programmes. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Trieste L, Lorenzoni V, Turchetti G. 2017. Razionale e strumenti della valutazione economica in sanità. In Manzi P, Carnevali L. (eds.). Manuale di Governance Sanitaria. PM Edizioni, pp. 427-440.

Additional material, case studies/examples will be available during the course. Specific chapters of books or article indicated in the references as well as course contents’ changes will be indicated during the course.

* highly recommended reference. The other references are indicative for an advanced course.

 

1st submission and presentation (for each student group)

The paper (min 3,000,  max 5,000 words) will be articulated as follows:

1) Title

2) Abstract;

3) Introduction;

4) Description of the selected technology/service (technical description, strength and weaknesses, its degree of novelty with respect to the state of the art), if it is a supporting (incremental or radical) or disruptive innovation;

5) Existing and potential market (also considering substitutive and complementary technologies and standards);

6) Potential barriers to the diffusion of the selected technology/services;

7) How to overcome the barriers;

8) Conclusions

A 15-min. presentation of the paper; 10 minutes for questions and answers.

2nd submission and presentation (for each student group)

Submission of the second paper on the business model for the service/product selected by  the student group.

The business model report will be articulated as follows:

1) Description of the supply system (product and service offered)

2) Market analysis and description of the market target;

3) Description of the internal organizational and resources, the supply chain for delivering the service/product

4) Communication strategies;

5) Pricing and costs, projection of revenues  i.e., balance sheet associated to the proposal.

A 15-min. presentation of a Business model Canvas that summarizes the business model; 10 minutes for questions and answers.

 

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Economia e Organizzazione dei Sistemi Alimentari.

Programma corso 2019-2020

 

Parte I: Che cos’è l’economia

 L’economia in relazione agli altri saperi

  • Cosa studia l’economia? Diverse risposte/diversi paradigmi
  • Il paradigma classico
  • Il paradigma neoclassico
  • Il paradigma evolutivo

 

I paradigmi alla prova nell’analisi: 

  • della produzione e dello  scambio
    • differenza sostanziale tra produzione e scambio: statica e dinamica, rendimenti, prospettive
  • nell’analisi dei mercati dei beni e servizi  
    • L’analisi dei mercati nell’approccio neoclassico
    • Livello del prezzo, quantità di equilibrio e strategie nei mercati concorrenziali, mercati non concorrenziali e monopolistici
    • Il ruolo delle barriere all’ingresso nell’approccio classico
  • nell’analisi del lavoro
    • Domanda e offerta di lavoro: disoccupazione involontaria nell’approccio classico e keynesiano e politiche economiche
    • Disoccupazione volontaria ed equilibrio nell’approccio neoclassico
    • Tecnologia e disoccupazione da Ricardo in poi
  • nella analisi della natura e degli obiettivi delle imprese
  • nell’analisi dell’ innovazione e il suo ruolo sulla crescita economica.
    • cos’è l’innovazione: definizioni e approcci
    • il ruolo dell’innovazione nelle filiere e e nella produzione agroalimentare

 

Riferimenti bibliografici 

- Roncaglia A. 2004. Lineamenti di economia politica. Laterza, Roma-Bari, capp. 1-9.  

- Roncaglia A, Sylos Labini P. 1995. Il pensiero economico. Laterza, Roma-Bari, capp. 1-3; 7-8.

 

Parte II Il quadro generale su crescita e sostenibilità 

- Crescita e sostenibilità, cenni storici sul concetto di sostenibilità: dall’attenzione alle future generazioni alle dimensioni di crescita economica, inclusione sociale e sostenibilità ambientale;

- “I limiti dello sviluppo”: critiche ed evoluzione, tra cicli economici e movimenti ambientalisti

- Sistemi complessi: proprietà ed evoluzione;

- Trade-off negli obiettivi dei sistemi alimentari in rapporto agli altri sistemi connessi: ambiente, sanità, economia.

 

Riferimenti bibliografici 

- Ganapini W. 2015. Per una lettura sistemica del rapporto tra agricoltura e ambiente. In Poggio PP (a cura di) Le agriculture: Contadina, industriale, ecologica. Jaka Book, Milano.

- Kotler P, Shalowitz J, Stevens RJ, Turchetti G. 2010. Marketing per la sanità. McGraw-Hill, Milano: Cap. 2.

- Modonesi C, Panizza C. 2015. Agroindustria, sistemi ecologici e salute pubblica. In Poggio PP (a cura di) Le agriculture: Contadina, industriale, ecologica. Jaka Book, Milano.  

- Sachs JD. 2015. L’era dello Sviluppo sostenibile. Università Bocconi Editore, Milano: Cap. 1 – 4; 10.

 

Parte III Tra macro e micro, locale, globale e glocale: il contesto europeo e italiano

- Obiettivi condivisi e soluzioni per un sistema di produzione agroalimentare sostenibile

  • Soluzioni globali, nazionali e regionali,  potenzialità e limiti
  • Soluzioni locali, potenzialità e limiti

- Il sistemi agroalimentare italiano in rapporto agli altri sistemi: filiere e struttura dell’economia agroalimentare.

- I sistemi locali, qualità e quantità: filiere corte, piccole produzioni e produzioni di massa

 

Riferimenti bibliografici

- Poggio PP (a cura di) Le agriculture: Contadina, industriale, ecologica. Jaka Book, Milano.

  • Magnaghi A. Dai paesaggi al cibo, nuove frontiere dello sviluppo locale
  • Cannata G. L’agricoltura in Italia: punti di forza e di debolezza.
  • Cingolani G. I sistemi colturali tra tradizione e innovazione.
  • Berton A. L’agricoltura biologica: la situazione del contesto italiano e globale.

- Marino D, Cicatiello C. (a cura di) I Farmers’ Market: la mano visibile del mercato, Franco Angeli, Milano: capp. 1-3; 6, 7.

 

Parte IV L’impresa agroalimentare: processi e strategie

  • Le funzioni e l’organizzazione delle imprese (introduzione)
  • Modelli di business e di impresa nel settore alimentare
  • Driver di successo delle imprese del settore: efficienza, qualità, controllo
  • Qualità, organizzazione e performance
  • Oltre l’impresa: gli stakeholders e la rete sociale
  • Il marketing
    • Il consumatore e i suoi simboli
    • La catena del valore
    • Le funzioni del marketing
    • Il processo di marketing: fasi obiettivi e attività
    • Il marketing mix per le imprese agroalimentari
    • I marketing rilevanti per l’impresa alimentare: il marketing relazionale, il marketing sociale, il marketing territoriale.

 

V Il neuromarketing dei prodotti alimentari

  • Neuroscienze, marketing, neuromarketing e tecnologia disponibile
  • Euristiche di scelta di prodotti e servizi in ambito alimentare in condizioni "normali" e con vincoli ambientali o condizioni particolari del consumatore
  • Disegno di campagne di promozione della salute attraverso stili di vita e regimi alimentari (social marketing) e promozione di prodotti e/o servizi alimentari basate sull'analisi di neuromarketing
  • Casi studio e simulazioni di neuromarketing: snack, vino, gelati. 

 

Riferimenti bibliografici 

- Jung, CG. 1983. L’uomo e i suoi simboli. Raffele Cortina, Milano, Cap.1

- Zaltaman G. 2003. Come pensano i consumatori. Etas, Milano.  Parte I  e II.

 

I riferimenti e materiali (articoli, slide) di sintesi e di approfondimento sul neuromarketing saranno indicati a lezione e disponibili nella cartella condivisa.

 

Informazioni sul corso

- Il corso prevede 42 ore lezione e si svolgerà: il martedì dalle 12 alle 13.30 aula B; il Giovedì  dalle 12 alle 13.30 aula C.

- La frequenza non è obbligatoria

Non c’è differenza di programmi tra frequentanti e non frequentanti ma la frequenza è fortemente suggerita.

Le slide riferite ad argomenti che sono presenti anche in bibliografia non sostituiscono il materiale d’esame, ma ne orientano lo studio e sono complementari. Le slide su argomenti in cui non sono indicati riferimenti bibliografici precisi o altro materiali sono necessarie e  sufficienti per la preparazione all’esame.

 

Esame: l’esame è in forma scritta con domande a risposta aperta e chiusa, salvo che la classe a maggioranza opti per l’esame orale

Ricevimento: su appuntamento, mandare una mail all’indirizzo: l.trieste@sssup.it

 

INFO:

Istituto di Management

Incarichi:
  • Consiglio Istituto di Management